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this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years,and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to
every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. jazeera.com. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet
and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. hi, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velsh
ajinsi ajinsidestory am. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love be
the west which could threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. >> host: susan thank you for being with us. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking with you. >> host: let's start with the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> guest: the picture at america's quite different from the other developed nations. we have god for very high. >> and download. >> in america cable monopolies and local monopolies in each region of the country dominate that market. and for 85% of americans the only choice with a live will be their local cable monopolies. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world's leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a deep digital divide so having an internet access at home is very tightly correlated to your socioeconomic status or maybe about half of the people with incomes between 30 and $50,000 a year have it at home and the number is lower for people with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have
to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>. >> john: myth number five, our drinking water is in danger because oil companies frack. what is that? >> controversy is over chemicals being injected into the earth to break up rock and release natural gas. >> john: it means shoving chemicals into the ground to frack the rock to release oil and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficientn energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels lke you are pumping stuff into mother ea
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had little choice. he had been summoned to court. prosecutors were ready to indict
. >>> thanks for watching. i am del walters. america tonight is next. we begin with america tonight. [ sirens ] >> we have a male black, blue hat, jersey and blue jeans, he was last seen going southbound. >> 15 years old. going southbound. >> it's like no other place in the united states. the heat, the intensity. the militarization. and the shear level of violence can often feel like a combat zone. in chicago, 72 people were shot, 12 killed. >> he was shot multiple times. >> in 2012, chicago led the nation with 500 people murdered. that's almost 100 more than killed in new york, a city three times its size. >> every single corner in that neighborhood is a drug corner. every single one of the. >> mike shield is a veteran cop who used to work chicago's west side. he's a curled member of the police officers' union. >> how would you describe chicago to people who don't know about it. >> it's almost like you're in a different country. it's almost like a third world. i know nationally people are talking when chicago, but the areas where the gun violence is going on isn't an area that a tourist woul
to another regardless whether it's america's cup or not are there improvements we could be doing while studying and figure out the longer term solutions as the projects are coming along and the longer term as well? >> yes president, yes and you're chewing gum and able to blow bubbles and we're seeing the bubbling up of ideas we're implementing this summer and for instance with the america's cup there are improvements that we started. i always like to link the america's cup planning with this assessment and there is no difference for the large event and what we need to do for the long haul. we are using these pilot projects how to run the e line service and see it running more because of the service from mission bay to the wharf and the bicycle lanes painted green is a brilliant idea and i checked it out and people are using the lanes in bigger numbers and no longer on the sidewalks. >> and they're stopping at the signals. that's the best part. >> that's the bubble blown and chewing gum. >> people are running in them and they're minding the traffic and i don't know about green compar
>> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you are in, working for new captain. we offer sexe tees and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington. demonstrators gather outside an israeli prison where 26 palestinians are released just before peace talks are scheduled to start. former u.s. president bill clinton sits down with the bbc offering his view on america's struggle to feigned an alternative solution in syria. >> sometimes you are not going to win them all. >> doing nothing is better than something sometimes. >> sometimes. not always, but in this case i think yes. >> and a fireworks show brought to you by mother nature. many look
and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you a pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt don features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono starte
. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you are pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these chemicae ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt damon features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono started artists against fracking. and so is the left wing media. >> it comes
and demand. america produces 10 million barrels of oil a day. we consume double that, but globally the world produces and uses 89 million barrels of oil a day, and 30% of that comes from the middle east. so it's oil traders, speculators who are to blame for driving up the price of oil. this week right now there is absolutely no supply problem on oil. today on twitter and facebook i've been asking you how would a spike in gas prices change your spending habits? on facebook canner ara writes, there would absolutely be less money for groceries and going out. the discretionary spending that supports my economy takes the first hit. this viewer said i would have to find a new job. i already have taken a pay cut and i'm low on cash now. the commute would exacerbate the costs. tweet us or leave us a question on facebook. maybe these increasing oil prices b which by the way has st this country in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other american cities have so-called underfun
in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with incomes between 30, $50,000 a year have internet connections at home but that number is even lower with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home, and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live because it is just not available and hasn't been billed out to their areas of that is the picture. >> host: how did we get here? it seems that the the internet started
struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the greaped, america needs a new marshall plan for our city to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's extra dation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he thought the -- sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace and equality. we must embrace that love and cease the violence. no more senseless newtown or columbines, no more daily killings of our young people by our young people on the streets of chicago and countless neighborhoods across the country. we need more gun control but we also need more love. yes, we all need love for each other, blarks white, and yellow, red and brown, gay and straight, christians muslims and jews. and all of god's children loving one another. we must embrace love and hold on to that powerful spiritual which inspired my father's generation and inspires us still today. we aren't going to let nobody turn us around. we aren't going to let n
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
? >> and now, "bbc world news america." president obama cancels a moscow summit with president putin. this after russia grantor -- granted edwards snowden asylum, sending at chill through relations. throughoutg flights the region. it cost billions and has the backing of key countries. inside a project which could power the future. pairs of atoms and infusing them together. this will release more energy. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. today relations between the u.s. and russia and another snack when president obama canceled a planned meeting with president putin in russia next month. this comes just days after russia decided to grant asylum to the former intelligence analyst, edwards noted. -- edward snowden. two towering figures on the world stage. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia g
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
america." president obama announced his government surveillance program and assesses this deteriorating relationship with russia. >> we're doing things that are good for the united states and hopefully good for russia as well. but recognizing there are going to be some differences. we will not be able to completely disguise them. >> hiding in plain sight. this sicilian mafia boss was living in italy for decades. italy wants him back to serve his time. it is summer. it must be time for that vacation souvenir. we will trace how the trinkets have become big business. onwelcome to our viewers public television in america and around the globe. today president obama held a wide ranging press conference at the white house on the eve of leaving for his summer vacation. on the agenda was announcing new oversight and transparency in the surveillance programs that have come under fire. relations with russia were also front and center. presidenturged clinton to think forward instead of backward. tourged president putin think forward instead of backwards. u.s. foreign and defense
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
. visit america's best today tosk about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you this summer, new york state is back and open for business. with endless beaches, hundreds of miles for hiking...or biking. endless rivers and streams ready to take your breath away. and more than enough wineries to please every pallet. we're ready to make your new york state vacation perfect. there's never been a better time to vacation in new york state. plan your vacation at iloveny.com the new state of new york. welcome. >>> now from abc2 maryland's most accurate forecast. >> good morning. let's look at maryland's most powerful radar as of now. and we are nice and dry but we see showers and thunderstorms now in west virginia and also western maryland. this is working its way off towards the east. so before it's all said and done we could get showers and storms. more isolated and scattered in nature as we continue through the morning. and possibly still linger as we go into the -- lingering as we g
threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. .. we don't have any of the fastest of the five cities in the world but comes to internet access in america, so we're not in the world leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack. we also have a very deep digital divide. having inaccessible kampf is very correlated tear socioeconomic palace. -- have a people have internet connections at home, but that number is even lower for people with incomes under 30,000 per year. rich people tend to have an and also 9 percent of americans cannot access the internet revenue because it has not been built up to their area. >> added we get here? it seems like the internet was started here. what is the divide? why has it not gone to people sums? >> quite a street. a great thing about the internet is that you can reach anybody. that is the whole point. a universal a disability program all idea was that the content provider, like google, would not be subject to the lens of a telecom provider, but we have this huge split between the ideals and openness of the internet is dependent
about coming to america. wide spread furry and december stress in distress over this in australia. >> there really has. disbelief, shock. chris was a rising star having the time of his life over in the united states. we've all heard about gun violence in america, but this really brought it home. parents in australia who may have children on scholarships in the u.s. and students themselves, just out of disbelief that could happen to one of ours. this is the front page in melbourne here today, "the herold son." it says the team's american police shot our star. it's senseless and the reaction from the family as well as reporting from that baseball club just north on melbourne here. family, friends and team mates and people from the local baseball club have been down there this week. terribly sad, they are placing a baseball with tributes, flowers on the home base. his mother and father held back tears and described chris as another normal kid. he loved baseball and the game since he was 15 years old and loved it because he wanted to go to college in the u.s., piers, and saw this was
for our pre game report. what is coming up on tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever. >> thank you. >> some members of the 1972 miami dolphins will be skipping a white house ceremony about their win. tonight's outrage hating panel is outraged. and a new poll which ask is the hottest, the dumbest, the craziest and more. our panel will insult all of you at one point or another. and sunny, the new portuguese water dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> thank you, we'll see you at the end. let's welcome our guest. despite what we put her through on this show she returns our e-mails and schools back. imogen lloyd webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. it is jake fogelness. check it out on something called itunes. bill schulz. he thinks she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> what
bila for a pre game report. jedediah, what is coming up ongp tonight's show? >> thanks, america's sweetheart. you are as adorable as ever.v our top story, some members of ths e 1972 miami dolphins will be swimming a white house ceremonyny because they don't like obama's politics. welcome to the club, boys. are they principal and admirable or meanies out to hurt our president's feelings. >> and a new poll asks which are the hottest, dumbest,t, craziest and we will find out more. and finally you will meet sunny, the family's new dog. i even want to hang out with the obamas on saturday night. >> see you at the end. let's welcome our tabes. well, despite what we put herde through on this show for several years she still returns our e-mails asking her to come back. i am here with imogen lloydebbe webber. her latest book is called "the twitter diaries." and he is as talented as he is tall. she on the set of "the good wife" right now. and proving that 99% in life is having a good name and great hair. next to me is buck sexton, not to be confused with the philanthropist. >> a block. the
to what could be a turning point for america and our involvement in syria. tonight, violent new clashes erupting right where the alleged chemical weapons attacks took place this week. and this evening a haunting new number. one million children sent fleeing from the violence, without homes, some of them ripped from their parents. that's the equivalent of all the children in boston and los angeles combined. tonight it's what the president is now saying about those alleged chemical attacks that signals america might soon be involved. abc's martha raddatz in the region on what it was the president said. >> reporter: these are the images that have had the white house huddled in marathon meetings. the suspected chemical attack, syrian women, children, estimates ranging upward of 1,000 killed. >> what we've seen indicates this is clearly a big event of grave concern. >> reporter: speaking to cnn, the president raising the stakes. >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. >> reporter: syria's chaos. its chemical weapons and its breeding of terror, a thr
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
, america is losing the battle against mary jane. this year new hampshire and illinois legalized medical marijuana bringing the to 20 the number of states where your pharmacist will soon look like this. (laughter) the dude prescribes. (laughter) and folks, the war on nugs used to have a strong ally on cnn's dr. sanjay gupta who opposed legalizing pot until now. >> i want to remind you that in 2009 you wrote a "time" magazine article entitled why i would vote no on pot. you changed your mind. >> i have. and as part of, you know, my thinking, the reason, i have apologized for some of the earlier reporting because i think, you know, we've been terribly and systemically mislead in this country for some time. and i did part of that misleading. >> stephen: wait a second, we were misinformed by a cable news doctor? (laughter) next you'll tell me i can't get directions to my cousin's house from fareed zakaria's gps. come on fareed, less on syria, more on how i get to where greg lives. (laughter) it's bad enough that is an jay gupta or as i now call him ganja soupta, okay-- (laughter) a global, g
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
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